New paint!

New paint!

Prepping my next frames ready for painting!

Prepping my next frames ready for painting!

St Mark’s Square (Version 4) - Oil and mixed media on board x9

St Mark’s Square (Version 4) - Oil and mixed media on board x9

Close ups!

Here’s a few of the squares in detail.

Oil paint on printed image.

Starting work on the fourth in the series.

Oil and mixed media on board.

For my next painting in the series I decided to break down the image into nine parts and print them onto separate boards, to create ‘a bigger picture’ in homage to David Hockney.
I had to section off the original image into nine new files on photoshop and then measure and cut each board to size and arrange them into a complete picture - like putting a puzzle back together.
Initially I had planned to scale the painting up from A0 to A0x4 but soon realised this would be too overwhelming and dramatically different from the rest of the series. I therefore increased the scale by the third to create more of a continuity within the series.

For my next painting in the series I decided to break down the image into nine parts and print them onto separate boards, to create ‘a bigger picture’ in homage to David Hockney.

I had to section off the original image into nine new files on photoshop and then measure and cut each board to size and arrange them into a complete picture - like putting a puzzle back together.

Initially I had planned to scale the painting up from A0 to A0x4 but soon realised this would be too overwhelming and dramatically different from the rest of the series. I therefore increased the scale by the third to create more of a continuity within the series.

St Mark’s Square (Version 3) - Oil and mixed media on board

St Mark’s Square (Version 3) - Oil and mixed media on board

So working through the process of painting has been a bit of a learning curve.
I attempted to project the photos onto the board initially, but disregarded this idea when I realised too much of the original image became abstracted too quickly. 
Printing each image brought with it a whole new set of issues, in particular printing costs which escalate each time I scale up the image. This means that I have to perfect each painting, because the price of re-doing a painting isn’t one I can afford!
The initial paintings were fairly successful, but with each larger scale I found the paper creased on the surface far more regularly and air-bubbles began to appear when I started painting. Though I do not see this as a hindrance (it reveals more of the process I commit to in creating the paintings by using the paper texture of the prints and creates a unity with the textural marks I make on the surface) I wanted to try and minimise this as the paintings get bigger so I remain in control of the finished image.
In order to do this I now must allow for a day to set and paste the image on to the board, and another day for the PVA primer to dry before building up layers of paint.
It makes the process a little bit longer, but if it means the finished painting will be better it’ll be worth it in the end!

So working through the process of painting has been a bit of a learning curve.

I attempted to project the photos onto the board initially, but disregarded this idea when I realised too much of the original image became abstracted too quickly. 

Printing each image brought with it a whole new set of issues, in particular printing costs which escalate each time I scale up the image. This means that I have to perfect each painting, because the price of re-doing a painting isn’t one I can afford!

The initial paintings were fairly successful, but with each larger scale I found the paper creased on the surface far more regularly and air-bubbles began to appear when I started painting. Though I do not see this as a hindrance (it reveals more of the process I commit to in creating the paintings by using the paper texture of the prints and creates a unity with the textural marks I make on the surface) I wanted to try and minimise this as the paintings get bigger so I remain in control of the finished image.

In order to do this I now must allow for a day to set and paste the image on to the board, and another day for the PVA primer to dry before building up layers of paint.

It makes the process a little bit longer, but if it means the finished painting will be better it’ll be worth it in the end!

St Mark’s Basilia (Version 3) - Oil and mixed media on board.

Final version.

St Mark’s Basilia (Version 3) - Oil and mixed media on board.

Final version.

St Mark’s Square (Version 2) - Oil and mixed media on board

St Mark’s Square (Version 2) - Oil and mixed media on board